Difficulty in relating oneself to space and to relate sets of objects to each other.

Symptoms Strategies
May be clumsy in movements. Gets into frequent fights for pushing or shoving, yet claims innocence. Didn’t see other children in time to avoid making bodily contact with them.
  • Avoid potentially humiliating competition.
  • Allow this student to be score keeper, etc.
  • Use non-competitive activities for P.E.
Struggles with directionality concepts.

Confuses left and right.

Has trouble with map work.

  • Play games involving left and right sides of body, i.e., Simon Says, Hokey Pokey, Angels-in-the-Snow.
  • Cues: Extending thumb and index finger of left hand creates letter L.
Combines cursive and printing in same assignment.

Difficulty with spacing of words.

  • May need to use computers for written assignments.
  • Copy of cursive alphabet at desk for quick, easy referral.
Uses mirror writing.
  • Make use of aide to work with student as often as possible.
  • Incorporate cursive writing as soon as possible.
Doesn’t start and stop at margins; crowds words at end of line or leaves too much space.

May not write on line.

  • Have student use width of finger as quick guide to begin paragraphs; can also be used at end of line.
  • Draw lines for student if none are present; help student see where to begin headings, etc. in order to allow for margins.
  • Draw a model of what you expect of student.
Misforms letters of similar configuration (i.e., quit-guit, false-jalse, size sixe).
  • Use color coding to aid in directionality.
  • Use a multisensory approach when appropriate.
Loses place while reading, uses finger.
  • Allow student to use a marker above the line.
Has trouble spacing numbers in math; lining up columns; calculations may overlap.
  • Have student turn paper horizontally to make use of vertical lines or use graph paper.
Has difficulty organizing problems on paper.
  • Box off the page in the most appropriate way, explaining the reason for the structure; require student to follow your example (eventually wean away from boxes).
Seems to be confused in finding his/her way around familiar places.
  • Have student verbalize the directions before leaving.
  • Assist student in drawing a map to follow.
  • Plan activities involving directions such as treasure hunts, hypothetical trips, etc.
  • Share ideas with parents.
Uses either hand at random.
  • Encourage use of dominant hand.
  • Give directions such as, “With your right hand, please pick up…”
Has difficulty organizing problems on paper.
  • Box off the page in the most appropriate way, explaining the reason for the structure; require student to follow your example (eventually wean away from boxes).